THE QUANTUM LINEAR Strength PROGRESSION 

 

After you've finished workouts 1-18, start with the Quantum Linear Progression.

If something isn't clear, please feel welcome to email us questions here.

CONTENTS

Introduction

Workouts 1-5

Workouts 6-10

Workouts 11-18

Quantum Linear Progression

 

WARM-UP EXERCISES

Warm-up: 2-4 min bike/row/skip/jog then 2-3 sets of:

pick 1 warm-up drill each for glutes/ lower body/ upper body.
 

WARM-UP EXERCISES FOR GLUTES

RDL w/ empty bar x10
Band side shuffles x5/side to fatigue
Glute star x8
Hip thrust x10
Glute massage w/ lacross ball 2min/side


LOWER BODY WARM-UP EXERCISES

30-45sec bear crawl
Groiners x10
Froggers x10
Squat w/ band around knees x10
Super squat hip mobility 2min/side
 

UPPER BODY WARM-UP EXERCISES

Shoulder pass throughs x15
OH band mobility 2min/side
Lacrosse ball massage for shoulder and pec 2min/side
Band Pull Apart x20

 

TRAINING TEMPLATE

This plan calls for 3 training days per week, with 1-2 days off between workouts. Monday, Wednesday, Friday is a typical way to split the week, although any other similar variation will work well. 

 

WEEK 1

Workout 1 (Monday)

A. Squat 3x5
B. Bench 3x5
C. Deadlift 3x5
D. 3 sets, alternating exercises: single arm bent over DB rows 8-12 DB + 15 cable back flys.
 

WORKOUT 2 (WedNesday) - Technique Day

A. Tempo Squat (5sec lowering phase)  3x5
B. Overhead Press 3x5
C. Barbell Row 4x5-10
D. 3 sets, alternating exercises: chin-ups max reps + 8-12 low box bulgarian split squats


WORKOUT 3 (FRIDAY)

A. Back Squat 3x5
B. Bench Press 3x5
C. Deadlift 3x5
D. 3 sets, alternating exercises: tempo ring rows, max reps + 12-15 front step-ups

 

WEEK 2

WORKOUT 1 (MONDAY)

A. Squat 3x5
B. Overhead Press 3x5
C. Barbell Row 4x5-10
D. 3 sets, alternating exercises:  chin-ups, max reps + 15 no money drill


WORKOUT 2 (WEDNESDAY) - Technique Day

A.     Pause above parallel back squat  3x5
B.    Tempo Bench Press  (5sec lowering phase) 3x5
C.    Deadlift 3x5
D.    3 sets, alternating exercises: 8-12 low box bulgarian split squats + tempo ring rows, max reps


WORKOUT 3 (FRIDAY)

A. Back Squat 3x5
B. Overhead Press 3x5
C. Barbell Row 4x5-10
D. 3 sets, alternating exercises: chin-ups max reps + 12-15 side step ups

 

 

RATE OF PROGRESSION ON MAIN LIFTS

SQUAT & DEADLIFT

  • Young men & heavier male lifers: add 10lbs per workout
  • Lighter men & most female lifters: add 5lbs per workout
  • Lighter females and most older lifters: add 5-10lbs each week (not each workout)

BENCH PRESS & OVERHEAD PRESS

  • Young men & heavier male lifers: add 5lbs per workout
  • Lighter men & most female lifters: add 5lbs every second workout
  • Lighter females and most older lifters: add 5lbs every 1-2 weeks

RATE OF PROGRESSION FOR BARBELL ROWS

Start at 10 reps and each workout add 5 and decrease reps by 1 until you get to 5 reps. Restart at 10 with 5-10 (5 for lighter lifters, 10 for heavier lifters) pounds more and repeat.

PROGRESSIONS FOR CIRCUIT EXERCISES

Start at the bottom end of the rep range and complete 3 workouts before increase reps by 1. Continue until you reach the top of the rep range. Restart with a slight increase in weight.

HOW TO DO WARM-UP SETS PROPERLY

Warming up isn’t just confined to a general warm-up at the beginning of each workout. It’s also important to perform “warm-up” or “build up” sets to gradually approach your working weights. These sets begin very light and gradually increase until you reach your top weight for the day, it allows your body to acclimatize to the weights so it’s not a shock when you get to your heavy sets, it also decreases the risk of injury and allows you to work on technique and groove the proper motor patterns when the weight is light.

Always start with the empty bar for your first set, even lifters who handle 500 or more pounds start with the empty bar. As a rule of thumb you want to perform 3 “warm-up” sets as a minimum (the bar is set 1). Make roughly even jumps between warm-up sets 2 and 3 and the first workset (set 4).

If you’re lifting over 200 pounds we recommend one warm-up set per 50 pound increment. So for example:

For a 200 pound lift (4 warm-up sets: 200/50=4)
set 1: bar (45) x10
set 2: 95x8-10
set 3: 135x5
set 4: 185x5
set 5: 200x5 (work set 1)

For a 300 pound lift (6 warm-up sets: 300/50=6)
set 1: bar (45) x10
set 2: 95x8-10
set 3: 135x5
set 4: 185x5
set 5: 225x5
set 6: 275x5
set 7: 300x5 (work set 1)

IMPORTANCE OF TECHNIQUE DAY

Day 2, in the middle of the week, is there to help you develop optimal movement patterns.

No lifter has perfect technique, especially newer lifters, and these technical flaws can lead to hard plateaus in the long run if they’re not corrected. The technique day uses movement variations that will help reinforce the proper mechanics of the lifts. This day will need to be lighter because the movement variations are harder. That’s ok, there’s a different focus on these days. Don’t treat it as an “easy day” and allow yourself to get sloppy since the weights are lighter than usual. This is the opposite to what you should do. Focus on performing each rep perfectly to get the intended benefits, and only use weights that you can handle with absolute perfect technique.

WRITE YOUR WORKOUTS DOWN

It’s important to keep a training journal, this gives you a place to record your workouts so you can see what you did before and track your progress. This feedback is crucial so you can continue to improve as the months and years of training add up. Having a written log also allows you to track trends over time, so you can look back at what you were doing when training was going well (or going poorly) and determine what works the best for you.

At the very minimum a training journal entry should include 1) the date 2) the exercises performed 3) the amount of weight used as well as the sets and reps 4) any general notes about how you were feeling that day.

Extras like notes on how your sleeping, eating or general life stresses outside the gym will help to make the journal more complete and give you more information to work with when looking back.

HOW TO REACT TO STALLED PROGRESS

What to do when you stall on the main lifts?

When you stall out on a lift for more than 2 sessions (can’t complete the recommended sets and reps at the prescribed weight) you want to deload and build back up using more volume. Here’s how you do that.

  • Decrease the weight 15-20%
  • Start with sets of 8 instead of 5 (to give you more volume)
  • Use the same weight increases each workout or each week as before
  • When you stall with sets of 8, switch to 5s in the next workout and continue to climb increase the weight as before
  • When you stall with 5s, switch to 3s and continue to climb

When you stall with 3s, deload another 15-20% and begin again with 8s, but this time add an extra set (to give you more volume, so for example instead of 3x8, you now do 4x8) and repeat Your lifts won’t all stall at the same time so you can deload and rebuild each movement separately as needed.

For example, suppose I reach 200lbs and can only complete 4 quality reps in my back squat instead of the 5 I’m suppose to do.

Unless that was an off day, in which case I can have another crack at it, I’ll drop my squat weight in my next workout by 20%, to 160lbs.

Squat Workout 1: 3x8 at 160lbsSquat
Squat Workout 2: 3x8 at 170lbs
Squat Workout 3: 3x8 at 180lbs
Squat Workout 4: 3x8 at 190lbs
Squat Workout 5: 8,7,5 at 200lbs [Stall at 8’s]
Squat Workout 6: 3x5 at 210lbs
Squat Workout 7: 3x5 at 220lbs
Squat Workout 8: 5,5,3 at 230lbs [Stall at 5’s]
Squat Workout 9: 3x3 at 240lbs
Squat Workout 10: 3x3 at 250lbs
Squat Workout 11: 3,3,2 at 260lbs. [Stall at 3’s]
Squat Workout 12: Drop 20% to 210 and start back at 3x8

WHAT TO DO AFTER 2-3 STALLS & RESETS

This will work for a time but eventually you won’t be able to “reset” your way out of a stall. At this point you may need variation in terms of rep scheme, periodization and the rate and/or method of progression. You may benefit from a more “intermediate” style program with some more variation and longer periods of progression.